Last week was full of typical Taiwanese winter days averaging around 28-30c with clear blue skies and refreshing sea-wind. I was just cruising around on the scooter, getting things done and enjoying Taiwanese winter, as I realize something strange.

So maybe to share that feeling with you, here’s a quick snapshot of what’s around me waiting for the lights to go green with a big group of Taiwanese on their scooters. It is, I promise you, a hot 30c day with the sun high above shining down directly at us:

The confusing Taiwanese winter : freezing at 30c

You’ll notice that, aside from the guy next to me (who doesn’t even bother with a helmet), all the Taiwanese are wearing heavy heavy coats and winter clothes, and I don’t mean just something to cover up from the sun. Yeah, you remember right – it’s still a 30c day.

But, it is true that this winter is very confusing, because at night – when it drops down to 22c, which in some countries is considered warmest temperature, I admit I sometimes feel cold. On the nights it gets down to 15c, I almost freeze if I’m not under a blanket, and I have no idea why that is. I try to warm myself by drinking tea and eating in Hot-Pot places, but I still feel very cold. The real killer is riding the scooter during the night – even when I have two coats on, my hands and mouth are covered, I’m with a full closed helmet- I’m still freezing cold.

It’s just 15-20c, why am I feeling so cold? there must be something that happens to the body when you move to a different country with different weather. If it’s under 35c at day, and 25c+ at night – we, the Taiwanese, feel cold.



Tags: freezing; guy; helmet; snapshot; sun; taiwanese; Taiwanese winter days; The confusing Taiwanese;


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MJ Klein
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it’s because of the humidity. Taiwan has a wet winter. i just had a US customer here last week. he’s from New England and he found our weather “bone-chilling.” i can sit outdoors all day wearing a t-shirt during the winter in New Hampshire (as long as there is no wind of course) but i wouldn’t dare do that here!

MJ Klein’s last blog post..Bushman’s Picks, January 27, 2008

range
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range

I recently came back to Quebec and faced -20C weather and inches of snow. I had been two years since I haven’t seen this. I like the Quebec winter weather though.

On my scooter in Taiwan, I usually wear motorcycle gear. I’m covered head to toe in any weather. I’d rather sweat than fall down and scrape something. I drive fast, that’s why.

range’s last blog post..He’s Listening

andres
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the humidity and the fact that all homes are concrete and tiles. the lack of central heat doesn’t help either

andres’s last blog post..olivia’s got a cold

Irwin
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Irwin

I visited Taipei in November. It was about 70F/20C and I was walking around in a T-shirt and everyone had this look of disbelieve on their face as if I’m an alien. Some woman in the MRT even offer me her gloves so I don’t get “cold”. I don’t get it either…

Eddie G
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Classic! I think a lot of the people actually wear a lot so that they can endure the chill of the air conditioning that is always set to something like 20 degrees Celsius. I once caught a cold by going to a mall in Taipei for a couple of hours and not wearing a sweater.

Viktor
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Couldn’t agree more! (MJ Klein and andres are right on the money, I suppose)

It’s my first time in Taiwan right now, and at first I laughed off my hosts’ warnings about the cold weather — but for the first time in years I was wearing two sweaters the other day.

Natasha
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Natasha

I’m in Queensland, Australia, and it’s exactly the same thing here! After about 9 years here (moved from England) I’ve managed to put it down to: a) Your blood thinning to adjust to the average temperature – yes, your blood thickens and thins according to the temperature. b) You being unprepared for colder weather. I remember in England I’d have a vest, thick socks, radiators, a jumper, an outside coat and possibly gloves/scarf. Here I only own a few thin jumpers. It gets cold. Thanks for all the blog entries, I’m looking at going to the Chinese centre in NCKU… Read more »

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